Coventry Inspiration Book Awards: The first eviction

We’ve read, we’ve discussed, and we’ve voted, and now the weekly vote offs have started.

The first books to leave the competition are:

What’s the Story? (Reception to Year 2) – Anansi And The Golden Pot by Taiye Selas

“Allow me to introduce myself.”
But he needed no introduction. “Anansi the spider!” said Anansi the boy. “The tales were true!”
“Traditional tales are always true,” the spider answered, laughing. “Nothing lasts so long as truth, nor travels quite so far.”

Kweku has grown up hearing stories about the mischievous spider Anansi. He is given the nickname Anansi by his father because of his similarly cheeky ways. On a holiday to visit his beloved Grandma in Ghana, Anansi the spider and Anansi the boy meet, and discover a magical pot that can be filled with whatever they want. Anansi fills it again and again with his favourite red-red stew, and eats so much that he feels sick. Will he learn to share this wonderful gift?

This charming retelling of a West African story teaches readers about the dangers of greed, and the importance of being kind. Tinuke Fagborun’s colourful illustrations bring the magic and wonder of the tale to life. When you’ve finished sharing the story, you can also find out more about the origins of Anansi folktales. This beautiful storybook is one that children will treasure forever.

If this was your favourite, look out for other Anansi stories of which there are many to enjoy regardless how old you are.

Telling Tales (Year 3 and 4) – Granny Came Here On The Empire Windrush by Patrice Lawrence

This heart-warming and heartfelt debut picture book from multi-award-winning author, Patrice Lawrence, will help ensure that the struggles and achievements of the Windrush generation are never forgotten.

One day, Ava is asked to dress as an inspirational figure for assembly at school, but who should she choose? Granny suggests famous familiar figures such as Winifred Atwell, Mary Seacole and Rosa Parks, and tells Ava all about their fascinating histories, but Ava’s classmates have got there first – and she must choose someone else. But who?

And then Ava finds a mysterious old suitcase – Granny’s “grip” – and Granny begins to share her own history, and how she came to England on the Empire Windrush many years ago. She tells her story through the precious items that accompanied her on the original voyage, each one evoking a memory of home, and as Ava listens to how Granny built a life for herself in England, determined to stay against the odds and despite overwhelming homesickness, she realises that there is a hero very close to home that she wants to celebrate more than anyone – her very own brave and beloved granny.

If you’d like to find out more about the Windrush Generation, try The Place for Me: Stories About the Windrush Generation, with 12 moving tales of sacrifice and bravery, inspired by first-hand accounts,

Hooked On Books (Year 5 and 6) – Kingdom Over The Sea by Zohra Nabi

My own Yara, if you are reading this, then something terrible has happened, and you are on your own. To return to the city of Zehaira, you must read out the words on the back of this letter . . . Good luck, my brave girl.

When Yara’s mother passes away, she leaves behind a letter and a strange set of instructions. Yara must travel from the home she has always known to a place that is not on any map – Zehaira, a world of sorcerers, alchemists and simmering magic. But Zehaira is not the land it used to be. The practice of magic has been outlawed, the Sultan’s alchemists are plotting a sinister scheme – and the answers Yara is searching for seem to be out of reach.
Yara must summon all of her courage to discover the truth about her mother’s past and her own identity, and to find her place in this magical new world.

If this was your favourite, look out for the second book in the series, The City Beyond The Stars, which will be published in April.

If you don’t want your favourite book to be evicted next week, make sure you keep voting!

Happy reading!